Coaching Versus Therapy

It’s quite often the case that a guy looks for a Life Coach for Men as an alternative to a therapist. Even in the past week I’ve had several Client Applications where the field designated “Tell Me Something About Yourself” became a rant about how the guy had tried therapy and hated it. I’ve spent nearly a decade coaching men under this brand, and it’s always the same:

• “I feel like I need a male mentor who understands my perspective, not a female coach or therapist.”
• “I don’t want to talk about my feelings, I want detailed instructions for how to fix my problems.”
• “I need guidance, accountability, and motivation…. not prescriptions and mirroring techniques.”

Whether you choose Man-UP! Life Coaching (MULC) or some other venue for male wellness and self-betterment, you owe it to yourself as a guy to try working with a mentor before taking the clinical route. This is not to say that a life coach is a viable alternative to a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist if that’s what you actually need. Neither would I suggest that holistic medicine is a viable alternative to your local hospital for obvious emergencies, such as lopping your finger off with a circular saw.

But.

The hard truth is that there are lots of licensed therapists out there who are frankly just really screwed up individuals that happen to have a degree or two, charge a ton of money, and offer impossibly poor services which send guys running from their offices and straight to the nearest bar. Further, even the good ones may be excellent for patients with clinical conditions, but not exactly the right fit for a guy who just wants help working on his social life, his marriage, his career goals, his fitness regimen, etc.

So if you’ve seen our branding out there and wondered what the deal is with our slogan The Bro Coach® Approach, it’s pretty simple. About ten years ago, I started a life coaching business for men when there was absolutely NO ONE working in this space other than Tony Robbins (whose enterprise model had already scaled beyond offering 1:1 coaching). My mission then was the same as it is now. To coach from a place of experience, dedication, and brotherly love; offering specific instruction to guys stuck in some aspect of life, and wanting a male mentor to help them get unstuck on onto bigger and better things.

For those of you reading this who may be inspired to try working with a life coach for men, I obviously advise it highly. For those of you already working with a coaching service, please consider finding a friend in your life who could use some direction — but may not necessarily need the “lie on the couch and tell me about your mother” routine” — and point them this way. Thanks.